The Story Behind a Door | The Daily Post

Every time I passed by these doors I often wondered what remained behind them. Often I though about cutting the chain and taking a look yet I was in the stage of life that tried not to invite trouble. As a kid I remember this on the news, and later in life met people who were there earlier in the night. Lucky for them they did not stay. april 081

This place burned down a few years ago after sitting empty for so many years.

The Wah Mee massacre (traditional Chinese: 華美大屠殺; simplified Chinese: 华美大屠杀; pinyin: Huáměi dàtúshā; Jyutping: Wa4mei5 daai6tou4saat3) was a gang-related multiple homicide that occurred on February 18, 1983,[1] in which Kwan Fai “Willie” Mak, Wai-Chiu “Tony” Ng, and Benjamin Ng gunned down fourteen people in the Wah Mee gambling club in Seattle. Thirteen of their victims lost their lives, but one survived to testify against the three in the high-profile trial. It remains the deadliest mass murder in Washington state history.

The Wah Mee club operated illegally in a basement space on Maynard Alley South, just south of South King Street in Seattle’s Chinatown. The club’s regulars included many wealthy restaurant owners, several of whom were among the victims. Security at the club was based in part on a system of passing through multiple successive doors, which had been used in similar Chinatown gambling dens for generations, and had usually been quite effective. Mak and his accomplices defeated the system only because they were known and trusted by the people at the club. Their presumed intent was to leave no witnesses, since club patrons could have readily identified them — as the one survivor, Wai Y. Chin, did. Mak had been planning the robbery for weeks, and he enlisted Benjamin Ng, and later Tony Ng.

via Wah Mee massacre – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Wah Mee massacre (traditional Chinese: 華美大屠殺; simplified Chinese: 华美大屠杀; pinyin: Huáměi dàtúshā; Jyutping: Wa4mei5 daai6tou4saat3) was a gang-related multiple homicide that occurred on February 18, 1983,[1] in which Kwan Fai “Willie” Mak, Wai-Chiu “Tony” Ng, and Benjamin Ng gunned down fourteen people in the Wah Mee gambling club in Seattle. Thirteen of their victims lost their lives, but one survived to testify against the three in the high-profile trial. It remains the deadliest mass murder in Washington state history.

The Wah Mee club operated illegally in a basement space on Maynard Alley South, just south of South King Street in Seattle’s Chinatown. The club’s regulars included many wealthy restaurant owners, several of whom were among the victims. Security at the club was based in part on a system of passing through multiple successive doors, which had been used in similar Chinatown gambling dens for generations, and had usually been quite effective. Mak and his accomplices defeated the system only because they were known and trusted by the people at the club. Their presumed intent was to leave no witnesses, since club patrons could have readily identified them — as the one survivor, Wai Y. Chin, did. Mak had been planning the robbery for weeks, and he enlisted Benjamin Ng, and later Tony Ng.

via Wah Mee massacre – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

via The Story Behind a Door | The Daily Post

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